Holistic drug and alcohol recovery programs are becoming increasingly popular within the rehabilitation community. But what does ‘holistic’ actually mean and how does a holistic approach to rehab help people to recover from substance addiction?Read more...

Boundary systems are invisible and symbolic "fences" that have three purposes:Read more...

A drug is defined as any substance that can alter the homeostasis of the body. Individuals consuming these substances can be described as using, misusing, or abusing drugs or any other substances.Read more...

Some people experiment with prescription drugs because they think they will help them have more fun, lose weight, fit in, and even study more effectively. Prescription drugs can be easier to get than street drugs: Family members or friends could have a prescription. But prescription drugs are also sometimes sold on the street like other illegal drugs. A 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health showed that among all youths aged 12 to 17, 6% had tried prescription drugs for recreational use in the last month.Read more...

Denial in addiction is particularly problematic because the downside of drinking (or drugging) plus denial and driving can be fatal for the substance abuser and others. Other health risks associated with denial in addiction include heart disease, lung and liver disease, overdosing and brain damage.Read more...

Have you ever wondered how much is too much drinking? Social drinking is an accepted part of life, and it's hard to know when the thin line to alcoholism is crossed. There are many factors--genetic, psychological, social, and environmental--that play a role in alcohol addiction. If you have wondered about what the right amount of drinking is, looking at drinking patterns is important.Read more...

How much a family is affected by a substance use problem depends on how long they have lived with it, how advanced it is, how much shame and secrecy surround it, and the roles and responsibilities of the person with the disorder. If the problem is left untreated, family members will also develop destructive behaviors, such as denial, enabling, and co-dependency.Read more...

A dual diagnosis is given to an individual who has both a mental disorder and an alcohol or drug problem. These conditions occur together frequently. Trying to manage just one of these problems can be extremely stressful. To complicate things further, add to the mix multiple symptoms that overlap and mask the ability to make a diagnosis, and what you are left with is a difficult and complex challenge to find a successful treatment. To achieve the best possible outcome, both disorders must be treated simultaneously because the cumulative effect influences all aspects of the individual’s life and greatly increases their risk for relapse.Read more...

A system of holistic healing can be a valuable ally to persons in recovery who are struggling to regain their equilibrium. Self-induced and self-practiced, yoga brings balance, greater awareness, acceptance of self, personal growth, and calm; lessens anxiety and depression and heightens self-esteem; and creates a positive social activity in an insightful context. Studies over 30 years have consistently concluded that meditation enhances recovery therapies and dramatically reduces relapse, as well as diminishing anxiety, stress, and depression. Furthermore, if we assume Abraham Maslow, creator of the "Hierarchy of Needs", was right, and happiness lies in self-actualization, it is interesting to note that in a recent study on therapies that lead to self-actualization, meditation techniques yielded extreme effectiveness, showing substantial positive gains in virtually every category of self-actualization, and in just two months (Williams, P., 2002).Read more...

Medicine and science are realizing that there are four levels of doctor-patient relationships:Read more...